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Welcome to question of the day #319

Eyetools question of the day #319

I own a community eye care practice and employ two optometrists. I’ve noticed that one of them discusses lens options and coatings with the patients while the other doesn’t. My dispensing staff finds it difficult to provide optimum lenses to those patients who see the second optometrist. What can I do?

It is part of the eye care specialist’s role to recommend lenses that will provide the patient with optimum vision and/or protection.

I will tell the patient the benefits of anti-reflection coatings-more light going into the eye, producing better vision and contrast, and better-looking lenses because of fewer reflections.

I will tell the patient the benefits of varifocal lenses over bifocals-no line, better-looking lenses, and some intermediate vision.

I will tell the patient the benefits of photochromic lenses-when outside, less glare, less light sensitivity, and some protection from cataracts.

I will tell the patient the benefits of high-index lenses-lighter, thinner and better-looking lenses.

I will tell the patient the benefit of eye protection-less chance of trauma to one of both eyes.

I will tell the patient the benefit of a backup pair of glasses-losing their only pair when travelling.

I will tell the patient the benefit of office varifocals-clear keyboard, screen, and nearby colleagues.

I do all of this in the consulting room because in the consulting room the patient will perceive this advice as clinical.

If this advice is given only by dispensing staff, it will be perceived as sales talk.

Advising patients of the clinical benefits of optimum lenses is in the best interests of your patients and will lead to a prosperous and sustainable business.