269.jpg

Welcome to question of the day #269

Eyetools question of the day #269

I am an eye specialist and own one practice. I want to make this a prosperous business so I can open another practice without out taking on a loan. Do you have any tips?

One way to increase the prosperity of the business is to increase the number of spectacles each patient purchases. It is in your patient’s best interests to make sure that all their visual needs have been met. They may not be aware of all their visual needs and even if they are they are unlikely to be aware of all the possible options to meet these needs.

A neat way to start this process is when the patient makes an appointment to say: ‘See you at 10:30 on Tuesday, Mrs. Kahn. Be sure to bring along a list of current medications, and any glasses you are currently wearing, including reading glasses, computer glasses, and sunglasses.’ Mrs. Khan might not have any of those, but it will get her thinking about them before she comes for her examination.

It is the eye specialist’s responsibility to find out all the patient’s visual needs during the history and symptoms taking part of the examination. Here are some suggested questions:

How is your distance vision? The aim is to update distance prescription.

How is your near vision? The aim is to update near prescription.

Do you need to look at near and then at the distance? The aim is to advise progressive lenses.

How is your vision in the office? The aim is to advise computer progressive lenses.

How much time do you spend outdoors? The aim is to advise sunglasses.

Do you do any sports? The aim is to advise contact lenses or spectacle lenses that will optimise vision for the sport.

Do you have any near vision tasks involving very small detail? The aim is to advise high add near lenses.

Do you attend social functions? The aim is to advise a glamorous frame.

Do you do anything where something might hit you in the face? Aim to advise eye protection?

Do you notice glare when you are outside? Aim to advise polarised lenses.

Identify the needs of the patient and write down your recommendations for the patient. Explain how fulfilling this need will help better their overall vision experience. Be specific in your recommendations so your patients know exactly what they should be looking for to satisfy that need.

 If another member of the practice team will be helping with frame and lens selection mention your recommendations to them and the patient again.

 Consider offering a discount to help make multiple pairs an affordable option.

Motivate your dispensing team with sales incentives. Popular ideas include a monthly team bonus if a goal is hit, a flat rate bonus for every second pair sale, or a percentage share for each multiple sale.